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Queen Elizabeth’s Drop Scones

Queen Elizabeth’s Drop Scones



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A recipe given to President Eisenhower by Queen Elizabeth II for drop scones, also known as Scottish pancakes.

Photography Credit:Elise Bauer

In honor of all things Royal, we present to you a recipe for drop scones, otherwise known as “Scotch pancakes”, that Queen Elizabeth made for President Dwight Eisenhower on the occasion of his visit to Balmoral castle in 1959.

According to the National Archives, the Queen prepared drop scones for the President, using a family recipe. Later she sent the President a letter and enclosed the recipe, with annotations and a suggestion to use treacle in place of the caster sugar.

When I first started testing this recipe, I couldn’t understand why the dough was more of a pancake batter, and not “scone-like” as I had imagined. Here in the states we think of drop scones like drop biscuits, instead of cutting out triangular shape scones for baking, we drop the dough from a spoon onto the baking pan.

But “drop scones” in parts of the UK, in particular Scotland, where Balmoral castle is situated, are more like American pancakes than typical scones. Drop scones are thicker than American pancakes, and a little smaller.

Original recipe from the National Archives

If you read the Queen’s recipe in the image above, note the use of “teacups” as measurements for flour and milk. Before Fanny Farmer we used teacups for measures as well.

To figure out how much a typical teacup holds, I tested two teacups, an English made one, and a French limoge. Oddly, when I filled each (completely different shape) tea cup with flour and weighed them, the result for each was exactly 100 grams.

By volume, the teacups were each 3/4 of an American standard cup. So “4 teacups” would be 3 American cups, and “2 teacups” would be 1 1/2 cups.

European butter has a much higher fat content than standard American butter, so if you have European butter, you may want to use it, to more closely replicate what the Queen was making.

Most recipes for drop scones I found add a little salt. I don’t know if the Queen used salted butter or not. Her recipe doesn’t call for it, but since I use unsalted butter, I added a little salt to the batter.

A note on the cream of tartar. We happen to have some in our pantry, but many people don’t. Cream of tartar is a dry acid. It combines with the alkaline baking soda to create the leavening in the scones.

Baking powder is just the combination of baking soda and cream of tartar with some corn starch thrown in, so if you don’t have cream of tartar, you can substitute both the baking soda and the cream of tartar with baking powder.

Queen Elizabeth’s Drop Scones Recipe

I've changed the method just a little from the Queen's original, by adding the wet ingredients to the dry, instead of the dry to the wet.

Ingredients

  • 3 cups (400 g) all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking soda*
  • 3 teaspoons cream of tartar*
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt**
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/4 cup of superfine sugar, or a heaping 1/4 cup white, granulated sugar
  • 1 1/2 cup (350 ml) of whole milk (and maybe a little more if needed)
  • 2 tablespoons butter, melted

*If you don't have cream of tartar, substitute the 2 teaspoons of baking soda and the 3 teaspoons of cream of tartar with 5 teaspoons of baking powder (make sure your baking powder is less than 6 months old or it may be flat and unable to provide leavening).

**If using salted butter, skip the added salt.

Method

1 Whisk together the flour, baking soda, cream of tartar, and salt in a large bowl.

2 In a separate medium sized bowl, whisk together the eggs and sugar. Then whisk in most of the milk.

3 Make a well in the middle of the flour and pour in the milk egg mixture. Whisk until smooth, adding more milk until you get the right consistency - thin enough to spread on the pan, but not so thin as to run. Fold in the melted butter.

4 Heat a griddle or large cast iron pan on medium to medium low heat. Coat the pan with a little butter, spreading it with a folded over paper towel. Drop large spoonfuls of batter on the griddle to form pancakes. When bubbles start to appear on the surface (after 2 to 3 minutes), use a metal spatula to flip the pancakes over. Cook for another minute, until lightly browned. Remove to a plate and cover with a clean tea towel to keep warm while you cook the rest of the drop scones.

Serve with butter, jam, or golden syrup (Americans sub maple syrup).

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Queen’s former chef reveals how to make the perfect scone recipe

Jessica Ransom July 17, 2020 10:56 am

Credit: Getty

The Queen’s former chef Darren McGrady has revealed how to make the perfect scones at home and they only take 15 mins in the oven.

Queen Elizabeth II ‘s former chef, Darren McGrady, regularly gives us a snippet in the royal family’s favourite foods. He worked at Buckingham Palace, Kensington Palace and around the world as a personal chef to Princess Dianna, Prince William, Prince Harry and the Queen for 11 years. He’s since released a series of tutorials on YouTube, which explain how to create some the most popular items he made for the royals.

These include classic afternoon tea treat, royal tea scones. In the video Darren explains that scones were a staple part of the Queen’s diet and she would alternate between plain and fruit scones, with raisins and sultanas, every day of the week.

He revealed: ‘She would always have afternoon tea wherever she was in the world. I remember being on the Royal Yacht Britannia, we flew out to Australia… and it was like 5 o’clock in the morning but to the Queen it was 5 o’clock in the afternoon, it was time for tea, so my first job was making scones.’

Darren’s recipe is listed below but if you’re looking for even more baking inspo, check out our recipe for savoury cheese scones or these gluten-free scones too.


Queen Elizabeth&rsquos Drop Scones (Recipe)

A ll you closet royalists no doubt caught some of the highlights of the Diamond Jubilee celebrations last Sunday. In case you missed it, more than a million people, undaunted by the rainy weather, thronged the banks of the Thames to wave wet flags at the Queen as she drifted by on the gilded Royal Barge, followed by a flotilla of a thousand boats. There she was, 86 years old, dressed in shimmery white and standing in the drizzle for hours on end, smiling and waving as she has for the past six decades. When it comes to pomp and pageantry and never giving in, the Brits have it down.

My brother, who still lives in England and is not given to emotional displays (he is British, after all) was so impressed by the Queen&rsquos undimmed sense of duty, he went so far as to suggest an absolute monarchy might not be a bad idea at this point. &ldquoI&rsquod rather have a feisty old bird with a sense of humor running the show than that bunch of self-seeking halfwits in Parliament,&rdquo he announced before heading off to the sofa for a Jubilee snooze.

Anyway, this blog is the Accidental Foodie rather than the Accidental Immigrant (another story altogether), so to mark the Jubilee in an Anglo-American way, here&rsquos a recipe for drop scones that the young Queen Elizabeth served President Eisenhower when he visited Balmoral in 1959. According to the British National Archives, it&rsquos a family recipe, and she made them for him herself. Don&rsquot tell Her Maj, but I&rsquove adapted it slightly. You can eat the drop scones with syrup (golden or maple), but served with strawberry compote and a scoop of vanilla ice cream they&rsquore a lovely summery dessert, fit for… anyone.

Queen Elizabeth&rsquos Drop Scones Recipe

3 cups all-purpose flour
2 tsp baking soda
3 tsp cream of tartar
¼ tsp salt
2 eggs
¼ cup of superfine sugar (or a little more if you use granulated sugar)
1½ cups whole milk
2 Tbsp butter


Queen Elizabeth II’s Drop Scone Recipe

As the longest serving monarch in England’s history, Queen Elizabeth II has met and spent time with countless world leaders. Owing to the special bond that the U.S. has with the U.K. this means that the queen has met many a U.S. President. However, there was one POTUS with which she exchanged quite a few pleasantries and at least one recipe: President Eisenhower.

In 1959 President Eisenhower requested the recipe for her drop scones after staying with the queen at Balmoral Castle in Scotland. In January 1960 the queen obliged, sending not only the recipe, but also a lovely letter reflecting on the visit, written on Buckingham Palace stationary.

She wrote, “Seeing a picture of you in today’s newspaper standing in front of a barbecue grilling quail reminded me that I had never sent you the recipe of the drop scones which I promised you at Balmoral.”

The queen went on, “I now hasten to do so and I do hope you find them successful.”

She also writes that when fewer people are expected, she decreases the milk and flour, but leaves the other ingredients as they are. The original recipe used teacups as measurement and was intended to feed 16 people!

For these reasons, an adapted and scaled down version of the recipe appears below, though it is interesting to think of the queen making breakfast herself for 16 people. If you make too many of these yummy drop scones then you can also freeze them for later use. Reheated they taste far better than any frozen waffle from the grocery store!

These drop scones are also known as Scottish pancakes and they do look very much like pancakes. But, these treats have a little melted butter and powdered sugar in them which elevates the flavor quite a bit.

We can’t think of anything better to serve for breakfast than the queen’s drop scones- which go perfectly with fresh berries and whipped cream or really any sweet toppings you can think of. Plus you’ll get the bragging rights of being able to serve a very royal breakfast to your family or friends.


Queen Elizabeth’s Drop Scones - Recipes

Every year the Queen holds four garden parties (three at Buckingham Palace and one at Holyroodhouse in Scotland) to honor thousands of her subjects (30,000 people in all!) Sadly, this year the garden parties have been postponed to 2021, but the palace has released the recipe used for the garden party scones as a consolation prize. The recipe follows the video.

500 g Plain Flour
28 g Baking Powder
94 g Butter
86 g Sugar
2 Whole Eggs
140 ml Butter Milk
100 g Sultanas – soaked for 30 minutes in hot water

Mix the flour, baking powder, butter and sugar together in a bowl, until a crumb is formed. In a separate bowl, whisk the eggs and buttermilk together.

Add the liquid to the crumb mixture. Continue to mix the dough, until it is smooth.

Add the sultanas, and mix until evenly distributed.

Remove the dough from the bowl, flatten the dough and cover. Leave to rest for approximately 30 minutes.

Roll out the dough to a thickness of 2.5 cm and cut to desired shape.

Rest the scones for another 20 minutes. Gently egg wash the top of the scones.

Bake in the oven for 10-12 minutes until golden brown.

Cool before serving with jam and clotted cream.

Recipe courtesy of: Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth the Second

Attendance at one of the Queen’s garden parties is by invitation only. You can’t ask for an invitation. Guests are there to be recognized for extraordinary contributions to their communities. You might not be able to ask to be on the list, but you can ask to be a guest of a guest! Every invitee gets to bring a plus one to the plush event.

Around 27,000 cups of tea, 20,000 sandwiches and 20,000 slices of cake are served at each garden party, with more than 100,000 saucers of tea served at the parties each year. The Queen favors Twining tea Earl Grey is her favorite, and sometimes Darjeeling. It’s just a coincident, but guess which two teas are stocked – right now – in my pantry?

the Queen loves a British confection called jam pennies. They are tiny raspberry jam sandwiches cut into circles the size of an English penny.

There is a very explicit dress code. Men wear casual or lounge suits, while women wear a conservative dress with a hat. Military uniforms are also often worn.


2 thoughts on &ldquo How to Make: Queen Elizabeth II’s Drop Scones &rdquo

Can’t seem to find the link to the national archives collection picture of recipe. Thanks for this, my Mom was a British war bride so anything British gets my attention and I love Queen Elizabeth as did Mom.

The link is in the underlined section next to ‘Cookbook’ up at the top. I double-checked the link and as of this morning, it was working. I’m glad you enjoyed the recipe. It was a fun one to make and eat.


INGREDIENTS

Ingredients for the Queen's fruit scones

  • 500g Plain Flour
  • 28g Baking Powder
  • 94g Butter
  • 86g Sugar
  • 2 Whole Eggs
  • 140ml Butter Milk
  • 100g Sultanas - a type of raisin (Cover in hot water and leave to soak for 30 minutes)

One of the Queen's famous garden parties


Queen Elizabeth II’s Drop Scone Recipe

As the longest serving monarch in England’s history, Queen Elizabeth II has met and spent time with countless world leaders. Owing to the special bond that the U.S. has with the U.K. this means that the queen has met many a U.S. President. However, there was one POTUS with which she exchanged quite a few pleasantries and at least one recipe: President Eisenhower.

In 1959 President Eisenhower requested the recipe for her drop scones after staying with the queen at Balmoral Castle in Scotland. In January 1960 the queen obliged, sending not only the recipe, but also a lovely letter reflecting on the visit, written on Buckingham Palace stationary.

She wrote, “Seeing a picture of you in today’s newspaper standing in front of a barbecue grilling quail reminded me that I had never sent you the recipe of the drop scones which I promised you at Balmoral.”

The queen went on, “I now hasten to do so and I do hope you find them successful.”

She also writes that when fewer people are expected, she decreases the milk and flour, but leaves the other ingredients as they are. The original recipe used teacups as measurement and was intended to feed 16 people!

For these reasons, an adapted and scaled down version of the recipe appears below, though it is interesting to think of the queen making breakfast herself for 16 people. If you make too many of these yummy drop scones then you can also freeze them for later use. Reheated they taste far better than any frozen waffle from the grocery store!

These drop scones are also known as Scottish pancakes and they do look very much like pancakes. But, these treats have a little melted butter and powdered sugar in them which elevates the flavor quite a bit.

We can’t think of anything better to serve for breakfast than the queen’s drop scones- which go perfectly with fresh berries and whipped cream or really any sweet toppings you can think of. Plus you’ll get the bragging rights of being able to serve a very royal breakfast to your family or friends.


How to make the Queen&rsquos favourite scones

Mr McGrady explains you start by adding flour, sugar, baking powder and butter into a bowl.

Scone recipe: The Queen always takes afternoon tea no matter where she is in the world (Image: GETTY)

Then rub all the ingredients together until you&rsquove got really fine breadcrumbs.

Then add the egg and slowly pour in the milk.

He warns against kneading too much and insists on lightly bringing the ingredients together instead.

Once the ingredients are combined, you should place the mixture on a lightly dusted surface and very gently knead the dough.


Queen Elizabeth’s Drop Scones

Prep time: 15 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 ½ cups flour
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 ½ cups whole milk
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 ½ teaspoons cream of tartar
  • 2 tablespoons butter, melted
  • clotted cream for garnish
  • 1 tablespoon honey for drizzling over scones
  • Berries or other fresh fruit for garnish



Directions

  1. Beat eggs, sugar and half the milk together, adding flour and mixing well.
  2. Add rest of milk, baking soda and cream of tartar, and finally fold in the melted butter.
  3. The batter should be thick and ‘droppable.’
  4. In a large frying pan spray some cooking spray and turn to medium low heat.
  5. Drop teaspoons of batter onto heated pan and allow to cook several minutes until brown.
  6. Flip and cook the other side, as you would a pancake. Keep scones on a heated plate until ready to serve.
  7. Add clotted cream, fruit and honey and serve.

via Darren McGrady, Youtube.

1. Set the oven to 350 degrees. In a large bowl, add the flour, baking powder and sugar.

Add and rub in the butter until it resembles fine breadcrumbs.

2. Make a well in the center and add the beaten egg and about ¾ cup

of milk. With a metal spoon bring the mixture together making sure you do not over mix it or you will tighten the dough.

3. If the mixture is a little dry add more of the remaining milk gradually

. (You don’t want the mix too dry, or too set that it sticks to the rolling pin.)

4. Lightly dust the table with flour and roll out the dough to about 1 ” thick. Then cut

using a 2″ round cookie cutter. Place on a baking sheet about 1″ apart and brush the tops

5. Bake for about 15 – 20 minutes. When cooked, lift onto a wire rack to cool.


Watch the video: Βρετανία: Ιππότη έχρισε τον Κάπτεν Τομ η βασίλισσα Ελισάβετ! 18072020. ΕΡΤ (August 2022).