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Barbecued courgettes recipe

Barbecued courgettes recipe


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  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Side dish
  • Vegetable side dishes
  • Courgette side dishes

Long strips of courgette are basted with a rosemary-olive oil mixture and cooked on the barbecue. Lovely as a starter or as a side dish with barbecued steaks or fish.

61 people made this

IngredientsServes: 6

  • 80ml extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh rosemary
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 6 small courgettes, sliced lengthwise into 1/2cm thick strips
  • 3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

MethodPrep:10min ›Cook:10min ›Ready in:20min

  1. Preheat barbecue for medium heat and lightly oil the grilling grate.
  2. Whisk olive oil, sea salt, garlic, rosemary and black pepper together in a bowl; brush evenly onto courgette strips.
  3. Cook on preheated barbecue until brown, 5 to 7 minutes per side; transfer to a serving platter. Drizzle balsamic vinegar over courgettes to serve.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(49)

Reviews in English (36)

by tilegirl

Wished I would have made more! The family loved it. Since we all don't like rosemary, I used a teaspoon of basil leaves. The kids would not have liked balsamic, so I sprinkled some grated Parmesan at the end. Will definitely make this again since I have more zucchini than I know what to do with. I would probably use only 1/2 teaspoon salt next time.-30 Jul 2012

by momtamc

My husband tried this recipe when his zucchini patch started to produce great quantities of squash. We wanted something that wasn't pan fried with cheese on top, like we always prepare it. This was fast, easy, healthy, and delicious. He didn't change a thing in the recipe. The flavor complemented the grilled pork we were eating. Since we always have the ingredients on hand, even the fresh rosemary, I saved it to my Recipe Box. We did use a good quality balsamic vinegar to ensure a great flavor.-22 Jun 2012

by Wyattdogster

This turned out a bit sweet, I know the balsamic vinegar is sweet, but the zucchinis have enough natural sweetness that the combination was cloying. I think that just a bit of lemon juice with the olive oil would make a good difference. Makes a very pretty presentation.-16 Jun 2012


Barbecued courgettes with bengali sauce

The Bengalis have a delicious dish of little aubergine rounds nestling in a lightly creamy mustard and yogurt sauce. It is truly tasty and forms the inspiration for this barbecued dish. Here I make the sauce separately (and very quickly), adding some tomatoes to the basic recipe, and have swapped the aubergines for courgettes, which work so well with the mustard flavours. This is an amazing side dish for any barbecue, but also makes a lovely, light course for vegetarians, in which case I sometimes add ricotta and/or two large handfuls of chickpeas for protein. A Bengali would use mustard seeds but, when you grind mustard seeds, they can sometimes turn bitter, so unless you are already familiar with this delicious but fickle spice, use the prepared mustard as I do here. It works just as well, you just lose a little extra body

  • Difficulty
    easy
  • Cooking time
    less than 30 minutes
  • Serves
    serves 2

Recipe Barbecued Zucchinis with Bengali Sauce

The Bengalis have a delicious dish of little aubergine rounds nestling in a lightly creamy mustard and yogurt sauce. It is truly tasty and forms the inspiration for this barbecued dish. Here I make the sauce separately (and very quickly), adding some tomatoes to the basic recipe, and have swapped the aubergines for zucchini, which work so well with the mustard flavours.

This Barbecued Zucchinis with Bengali Sauce is an amazing side dish for any barbecue, but also makes a lovely, light course for vegetarians, in which case I sometimes add ricotta and/or two large handfuls of chickpeas for protein. A Bengali would use mustard seeds but, when you grind mustard seeds, they can sometimes turn bitter, so unless you are already familiar with this delicious but fickle spice, use the prepared mustard as I do here. It works just as well, you just lose a little extra body. The sauce is also delicious with some barbecued chicken and fish, so maybe make some extra!


Barbecued courgettes with yoghurt

This is a good way to use up old courgettes, because the whole exterior is charred, much like an aubergine for baba ganoush, so you don’t notice any imperfections of age. Lay one courgette per person on a hot barbecue (or griddle), and cook on each side until slightly but evenly blackened all over. Roughly chop, gently crush, then season. Put on a platter, then splatter, Jackson Pollock-style, with yoghurt, honey, lemon juice and crushed toasted nuts. As an optional extra, roughly chop a large courgette leaf and stem (or a few pak choi leaves), wilt in hot olive oil, then scatter on top. Finish with a few torn courgette flowers.

Tom Hunt is a chef, food writer, sustainability campaigner and founder of Poco Tapas Bar in Bristol


Called to the bars

I really hope you're reading this with a weekend of nothing much at all ahead of you, and that you're enjoying some fine weather to do nothing much at all in. Of course, you never can tell - we could have hail and gales and thunderstorms. Luckily, though, all this week's recipes can be cooked and eaten indoors as well as out - such are the wonders of modern life.

But I'm hoping you'll get to try one or two of them in that hazy evening light, after 9pm, during those few early July weeks when we can find ourselves suddenly, and quite unselfconsciously, living like continentals. Hell, we might even take up smoking again.

The vegetables are now crying out to be picked before they hit middle age. And the weeds are just asking to be ignored. If you grow your own veg, now is the time to remind yourself what you're doing it for in the first place - and eating in the garden is the best way I know. Devouring the fruits of your harvest while admiring what's coming next definitely stimulates the appetite and heightens the senses (though possibly less so with livestock than with fruit and veg).

Besides eating out of doors, there's also the option of cooking out of doors. You don't have to declare barbecue, and run straight for the sausages and chops. Forget all that primal macho posturing, and instead think of hot charcoal as a very flexible cooking medium that allows you to enjoy the scenery. You can even fry an egg on a barbecue, if that's what you fancy for supper. And you can do so while keeping an eye on the hens that laid it.

Whether frying, boiling or grilling, over wood, charcoal or even dried peat, the only rule is this: don't cook over flames, cook over embers - you want glowing, hot coals with a dusting of pale ash.

I'm going to steer clear of meat altogether today, though I've no objection to you bringing some to the feast. I just want to emphasise the versatility of cooking over fire - and remind you of the pleasure that mild, controlled incineration can bring to vegetables and even bread.

Round out the feast with some chilled cider or rosé, and help the kids make their own quick-fix elderflower lemonade. It's simple enough. Roughly chop three unwaxed lemons and blitz them in a food processor with about 125g of caster sugar, a few heads of elderflower and 500ml of water. Leave to stand for a few minutes, then strain through a sieve into a jug, pressing down to squeeze as much juice out of the pulp as possible. Top up with more cold water - up to 500ml - to taste, and serve over ice. Summery enough for you?

Barbecued little gem lettuces

Grilling gives the lettuce the slightly crunchy, bitter quality of fried seaweed. A great summer starter. Serves four.

4 little gem lettuce hearts, halved

5 tbsp olive oil

12 spring onions, trimmed

Sea salt and ground black pepper

60-80g Ticklemore cheese (or other hard goat's cheese)

Brush the cut side of the lettuces with a little olive oil and place on the hot barbecue. After a minute or so, turn over, and place the spring onions, also brushed with olive oil, on to the barbecue alongside the lettuce. When both are pleasantly charred and slightly softened, divide them between four plates. Trickle over a little more olive oil, season and use a vegetable peeler to shave over the goat's cheese. Serve immediately.

Grilled courgettes with tahini dressing

This dish is great as it is, or served as an easy side dish with barbecued lamb chops, say, or, best of all, wrapped in the flatbread recipe that follows. Serves four.

55ml tahini

Juice of ½ lemon

1 clove garlic, grated

450g courgettes, sliced 1cm thick lengthwise

3 tbsp olive or rapeseed oil, plus more for drizzling

Freshly ground black pepper

3 tbsp fresh mint leaves, shredded

First make the dressing, which is a cinch - just whisk together the tahini, water, lemon juice, garlic and a pinch of salt, then set aside.

Brush the courgettes with oil, sprinkle with a little salt and grill over medium coals until lightly charred and tender - about four minutes on each side.

Arrange the courgettes on a plate, drizzle over some of the tahini dressing and a splash or two of oil, a few grinds of pepper, some salt flakes and a sprinkling of mint. Serve immediately.

Dan's barbecued flatbreads

These breads, which were devised by Dan Stevens, one of the chefs at River Cottage, are perfect with grilled food, with or without the spicy glaze. These quantities make enough for six people.

250g plain flour, plus extra for dusting

250g strong white bread flour

5g easy-blend yeast

1 tbsp good-quality olive oil (plus extra for glazing optional)

325ml hot water, or an equal mixture of hot water and natural yogurt

½ tsp cumin seeds

½ tsp coriander seeds

20g unsalted butter

2 tbsp olive oil

A good pinch of smoked paprika

If you want to make a glaze for your flatbreads, start with that otherwise, skip this and go straight to the next paragraph. Heat a small frying pan over a medium heat, and when hot toast the cumin and coriander seeds for a minute or so until they release their fragrance. Grind with a pestle and mortar. Melt the butter, whisk in the olive oil, the ground cumin and coriander, and the paprika. Brush the glaze over the breads just before putting them on the grill, or do so just after they come off the grill - both approaches work well.

To make the flatbreads, mix all of the dry ingredients in a bowl and make a well in the centre. Tip the water (or the yogurt/water mix) into this well, pour in the olive oil, and mix together. Knead the dough until smooth, silky and elastic, then brush it with oil, cover and leave to rise until doubled in size. Deflate the dough, then leave to rise a second time, again until almost doubled in size.

Tear off pieces of dough the size of small lemons. Using plenty of flour on both your hands and the worksurface, shape them into rounds and roll out to 3-4mm thick. Leave each one to rest for five minutes or so.

Brush the flatbreads with the seasoned butter glaze or olive oil (both optional), then cook over a hot barbecue for four to five minutes, turning once, until puffed up and just beginning to char. Serve at once.


  • 4 medium courgettes
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 75g diced chorizo
  • 2 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 335g cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 1 tbsp tomato purée
  • 1 tsp dried mixed herbs
  • 150g ball mozzarella, torn into small pieces
  • 28g fresh basil, roughly torn

Preheat the oven to 200°C/fan 180°C/gas mark 6. Halve the courgettes lengthways. Scoop out the seeds using a teaspoon and roughly chop them. Place the courgette halves on a roasting tray, brush with the oil and bake for 12-15 minutes, until just soft.

Meanwhile, add the diced chorizo to a medium saucepan over a medium heat and cook for 3-4 minutes, until golden and the oil has started to release. Add the garlic and cook for a further minute. Add the courgette seeds, tomatoes, tomato purée and dried herbs with seasoning and simmer for 5 minutes with the lid on, until the tomatoes have softened and burst slightly. Remove the lid and cook for a further 5 minutes until thickened. Stir through half the basil.

Preheat your grill to the highest setting. Divide the tomato mixture between the roasted courgettes and top with the mozzarella. Place under the grill for 3-4 minutes, until the mozzarella is melted and golden. Top with the remaining basil and divide between 4 plates to serve.


  1. Light your barbecue about 30-45 minutes before you want to start cooking.
  2. Cut courgettes in half widthways cut each half into quarters, lengthways. Cut each pepper half lengthways into 3.
  3. Place courgettes and peppers in a bowl. Add 2 teaspoons of olive oil and the garlic toss to coat.
  4. Place courgettes and peppers in a single layer on rack over barbecue. Cook for 4-6 minutes on each side or until tender and lightly charred, turning once.
  5. Combine remaining olive oil, lemon juice, shredded mint and black pepper in a small bowl add lemon zest to taste and whisk together. Drizzle over vegetables before serving.

Recipe adapted from British Heart Foundation 'Healthy Living'

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Spicy barbecued courgettes

A lovely way to barbecue courgettes, even those who wouldn't eat them might be tempted to change their minds.

Ingredients

Mise en place

  • Add all of the ingredients to a Lock & Lock box
  • Close the lid and shake well to coat the courgettes
  • Leave to marinade while the barbecue warms up

Method

  1. Drain the courgettes - the salt in the seasoning will cause the courgettes to leech some water.
  2. Griddle on the barbecue for about 3 minutes a side, turning once.

Serving suggestions

Variations

Use any combination of spices - crushed garlic would be a nice addition.

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#courgettes #barbecue #spicybarbecuedcourgettes #miseenplace #griddle #marinade #grilled #griddled #barbecued #spices #oliveoil


Directions

1. Place the lamb, garlic, mustard, rosemary, lemon and 1 tbsp olive oil into a large bowl or sealable plastic bag. Toss until the lamb is well-coated, cover and refrigerate for at least 2 hours, preferably overnight. Remove from fridge 1 hour before cooking.

2. To make the dressing: place the yolks, mustard and lemon into a blender. Drizzle in the oil slowly until you have a thick but pourable consistency. Add the mint and season with salt and pepper.

3. Preheat a barbecue to a medium heat. Cook the lamb for 20 minutes each side or until done to your liking. Remove, cover and set aside. Place the remaining oil on the barbecue. Season the courgettes and cook for 3 or 4 minutes each side until golden and delicious.

4. Place the tomato slices on a platter. Add the courgettes and top with slices of lamb, drizzle the dressing, and garnish with basil.


Recipe: Barbecue Lamb with Tomatoes and Courgettes

• 1kg boneless lamb leg
• 4 cloves garlic, crushed
• 2 tsp grainy mustard
• ¼ cup chopped rosemary
• Zest and juice of 1 lemon
• 2 Tbsp olive oil
• 4 courgettes, cut lengthways
• Salt and pepper
• 4 tomatoes, cut into thick slices
• ¼ cup basil leaves

Dressing
• 2 egg yolks
• 1 tsp grainy mustard
• Juice of ½ lemon
• ½ cup olive oil
• ¼ cup chopped mint

1. Place the lamb, garlic, mustard, rosemary, lemon and 1 tbsp olive oil into a large bowl or sealable plastic bag. Toss until the lamb is well-coated, cover and refrigerate for at least 2 hours, preferably overnight. Remove from fridge 1 hour before cooking.

2. To make the dressing: place the yolks, mustard and lemon into a blender.

Drizzle in the oil slowly until you have a thick but pourable consistency. Add the herbs and season with salt and pepper.

3. Preheat a barbecue to a medium heat. Cook the lamb for 20 minutes each side or until done to your liking. Remove, cover and set aside. Place the remaining oil on the barbecue. Season the courgettes and cook for 3 or 4 minutes each side until golden and delicious.

4. Place the tomato slices on a platter. Add the courgettes and top with slices of lamb, drizzle the dressing, and garnish with basil.



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