Cocktail Recipes, Spirits, and Local Bars

Rihanna Leaves $200 Tip at Austin Bar

Rihanna Leaves $200 Tip at Austin Bar



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Looks like Amy Schumer isn’t the only generous celebrity tipper. TMZ reports that Rihanna and company racked up a bill of $82.25 when they were there for about 45 minutes, sipping on Jameson and Cokes.

The star made herself comfortable at the bar, interacting with fans and giving them high-fives. It was reported that her bodyguards only intervened to block some girls that tried to follow Rihanna to the bathroom.

Fox News reports that Rihanna headed to a strip club with opener Travis Scott after her concert at the Toyota Center in Houston on Sunday, and reportedly spent $15,000 during her two-hour visit.

Check out our story on how filming ‘Work’ at a Toronto restaurant helped boost sales.


Share All sharing options for: Review: These Are the Seven Best High-Performance Drink Blenders

Who makes the best blender for smoothies and mixed drinks? Nick Solares

People want a $200 blender that’s as good as a Vitamix or Blendtec. That doesn’t exist. But after researching dozens of blenders, talking with five experts and testing 16 models over the course of three years, we’ve found that you don’t have to plunk down half a grand for a great blender, but you should if you want the absolute silkiest frozen drinks. Most lower-end blenders, with their smaller motors, just aren’t up to the task, producing grainy textures or burning out with the strain of daily use. In the past, the only blenders that could really liquify kale stems, berry seeds, or ice were expensive high-performance models—Vitamix and Blendtec-level machines—which have much stronger motors.

However, some of the newer, relatively modestly-priced high-performance machines are surprisingly efficient at liquefying food. And we wanted to see how some of these newcomers would compare with the $400+ models.

To test, we made green smoothies packed with frozen berries, kale, and ice. We strained the mixtures through a fine-mesh sieve to see how much pulp or berry seeds remained behind. We puréed hot soup, bean dip, turned peanuts into peanut butter, and attempted to make mayonnaise. As a final round, we made piña coladas to see how well the machines blended ice into slush.


Share All sharing options for: Review: These Are the Seven Best High-Performance Drink Blenders

Who makes the best blender for smoothies and mixed drinks? Nick Solares

People want a $200 blender that’s as good as a Vitamix or Blendtec. That doesn’t exist. But after researching dozens of blenders, talking with five experts and testing 16 models over the course of three years, we’ve found that you don’t have to plunk down half a grand for a great blender, but you should if you want the absolute silkiest frozen drinks. Most lower-end blenders, with their smaller motors, just aren’t up to the task, producing grainy textures or burning out with the strain of daily use. In the past, the only blenders that could really liquify kale stems, berry seeds, or ice were expensive high-performance models—Vitamix and Blendtec-level machines—which have much stronger motors.

However, some of the newer, relatively modestly-priced high-performance machines are surprisingly efficient at liquefying food. And we wanted to see how some of these newcomers would compare with the $400+ models.

To test, we made green smoothies packed with frozen berries, kale, and ice. We strained the mixtures through a fine-mesh sieve to see how much pulp or berry seeds remained behind. We puréed hot soup, bean dip, turned peanuts into peanut butter, and attempted to make mayonnaise. As a final round, we made piña coladas to see how well the machines blended ice into slush.


Share All sharing options for: Review: These Are the Seven Best High-Performance Drink Blenders

Who makes the best blender for smoothies and mixed drinks? Nick Solares

People want a $200 blender that’s as good as a Vitamix or Blendtec. That doesn’t exist. But after researching dozens of blenders, talking with five experts and testing 16 models over the course of three years, we’ve found that you don’t have to plunk down half a grand for a great blender, but you should if you want the absolute silkiest frozen drinks. Most lower-end blenders, with their smaller motors, just aren’t up to the task, producing grainy textures or burning out with the strain of daily use. In the past, the only blenders that could really liquify kale stems, berry seeds, or ice were expensive high-performance models—Vitamix and Blendtec-level machines—which have much stronger motors.

However, some of the newer, relatively modestly-priced high-performance machines are surprisingly efficient at liquefying food. And we wanted to see how some of these newcomers would compare with the $400+ models.

To test, we made green smoothies packed with frozen berries, kale, and ice. We strained the mixtures through a fine-mesh sieve to see how much pulp or berry seeds remained behind. We puréed hot soup, bean dip, turned peanuts into peanut butter, and attempted to make mayonnaise. As a final round, we made piña coladas to see how well the machines blended ice into slush.


Share All sharing options for: Review: These Are the Seven Best High-Performance Drink Blenders

Who makes the best blender for smoothies and mixed drinks? Nick Solares

People want a $200 blender that’s as good as a Vitamix or Blendtec. That doesn’t exist. But after researching dozens of blenders, talking with five experts and testing 16 models over the course of three years, we’ve found that you don’t have to plunk down half a grand for a great blender, but you should if you want the absolute silkiest frozen drinks. Most lower-end blenders, with their smaller motors, just aren’t up to the task, producing grainy textures or burning out with the strain of daily use. In the past, the only blenders that could really liquify kale stems, berry seeds, or ice were expensive high-performance models—Vitamix and Blendtec-level machines—which have much stronger motors.

However, some of the newer, relatively modestly-priced high-performance machines are surprisingly efficient at liquefying food. And we wanted to see how some of these newcomers would compare with the $400+ models.

To test, we made green smoothies packed with frozen berries, kale, and ice. We strained the mixtures through a fine-mesh sieve to see how much pulp or berry seeds remained behind. We puréed hot soup, bean dip, turned peanuts into peanut butter, and attempted to make mayonnaise. As a final round, we made piña coladas to see how well the machines blended ice into slush.


Share All sharing options for: Review: These Are the Seven Best High-Performance Drink Blenders

Who makes the best blender for smoothies and mixed drinks? Nick Solares

People want a $200 blender that’s as good as a Vitamix or Blendtec. That doesn’t exist. But after researching dozens of blenders, talking with five experts and testing 16 models over the course of three years, we’ve found that you don’t have to plunk down half a grand for a great blender, but you should if you want the absolute silkiest frozen drinks. Most lower-end blenders, with their smaller motors, just aren’t up to the task, producing grainy textures or burning out with the strain of daily use. In the past, the only blenders that could really liquify kale stems, berry seeds, or ice were expensive high-performance models—Vitamix and Blendtec-level machines—which have much stronger motors.

However, some of the newer, relatively modestly-priced high-performance machines are surprisingly efficient at liquefying food. And we wanted to see how some of these newcomers would compare with the $400+ models.

To test, we made green smoothies packed with frozen berries, kale, and ice. We strained the mixtures through a fine-mesh sieve to see how much pulp or berry seeds remained behind. We puréed hot soup, bean dip, turned peanuts into peanut butter, and attempted to make mayonnaise. As a final round, we made piña coladas to see how well the machines blended ice into slush.


Share All sharing options for: Review: These Are the Seven Best High-Performance Drink Blenders

Who makes the best blender for smoothies and mixed drinks? Nick Solares

People want a $200 blender that’s as good as a Vitamix or Blendtec. That doesn’t exist. But after researching dozens of blenders, talking with five experts and testing 16 models over the course of three years, we’ve found that you don’t have to plunk down half a grand for a great blender, but you should if you want the absolute silkiest frozen drinks. Most lower-end blenders, with their smaller motors, just aren’t up to the task, producing grainy textures or burning out with the strain of daily use. In the past, the only blenders that could really liquify kale stems, berry seeds, or ice were expensive high-performance models—Vitamix and Blendtec-level machines—which have much stronger motors.

However, some of the newer, relatively modestly-priced high-performance machines are surprisingly efficient at liquefying food. And we wanted to see how some of these newcomers would compare with the $400+ models.

To test, we made green smoothies packed with frozen berries, kale, and ice. We strained the mixtures through a fine-mesh sieve to see how much pulp or berry seeds remained behind. We puréed hot soup, bean dip, turned peanuts into peanut butter, and attempted to make mayonnaise. As a final round, we made piña coladas to see how well the machines blended ice into slush.


Share All sharing options for: Review: These Are the Seven Best High-Performance Drink Blenders

Who makes the best blender for smoothies and mixed drinks? Nick Solares

People want a $200 blender that’s as good as a Vitamix or Blendtec. That doesn’t exist. But after researching dozens of blenders, talking with five experts and testing 16 models over the course of three years, we’ve found that you don’t have to plunk down half a grand for a great blender, but you should if you want the absolute silkiest frozen drinks. Most lower-end blenders, with their smaller motors, just aren’t up to the task, producing grainy textures or burning out with the strain of daily use. In the past, the only blenders that could really liquify kale stems, berry seeds, or ice were expensive high-performance models—Vitamix and Blendtec-level machines—which have much stronger motors.

However, some of the newer, relatively modestly-priced high-performance machines are surprisingly efficient at liquefying food. And we wanted to see how some of these newcomers would compare with the $400+ models.

To test, we made green smoothies packed with frozen berries, kale, and ice. We strained the mixtures through a fine-mesh sieve to see how much pulp or berry seeds remained behind. We puréed hot soup, bean dip, turned peanuts into peanut butter, and attempted to make mayonnaise. As a final round, we made piña coladas to see how well the machines blended ice into slush.


Share All sharing options for: Review: These Are the Seven Best High-Performance Drink Blenders

Who makes the best blender for smoothies and mixed drinks? Nick Solares

People want a $200 blender that’s as good as a Vitamix or Blendtec. That doesn’t exist. But after researching dozens of blenders, talking with five experts and testing 16 models over the course of three years, we’ve found that you don’t have to plunk down half a grand for a great blender, but you should if you want the absolute silkiest frozen drinks. Most lower-end blenders, with their smaller motors, just aren’t up to the task, producing grainy textures or burning out with the strain of daily use. In the past, the only blenders that could really liquify kale stems, berry seeds, or ice were expensive high-performance models—Vitamix and Blendtec-level machines—which have much stronger motors.

However, some of the newer, relatively modestly-priced high-performance machines are surprisingly efficient at liquefying food. And we wanted to see how some of these newcomers would compare with the $400+ models.

To test, we made green smoothies packed with frozen berries, kale, and ice. We strained the mixtures through a fine-mesh sieve to see how much pulp or berry seeds remained behind. We puréed hot soup, bean dip, turned peanuts into peanut butter, and attempted to make mayonnaise. As a final round, we made piña coladas to see how well the machines blended ice into slush.


Share All sharing options for: Review: These Are the Seven Best High-Performance Drink Blenders

Who makes the best blender for smoothies and mixed drinks? Nick Solares

People want a $200 blender that’s as good as a Vitamix or Blendtec. That doesn’t exist. But after researching dozens of blenders, talking with five experts and testing 16 models over the course of three years, we’ve found that you don’t have to plunk down half a grand for a great blender, but you should if you want the absolute silkiest frozen drinks. Most lower-end blenders, with their smaller motors, just aren’t up to the task, producing grainy textures or burning out with the strain of daily use. In the past, the only blenders that could really liquify kale stems, berry seeds, or ice were expensive high-performance models—Vitamix and Blendtec-level machines—which have much stronger motors.

However, some of the newer, relatively modestly-priced high-performance machines are surprisingly efficient at liquefying food. And we wanted to see how some of these newcomers would compare with the $400+ models.

To test, we made green smoothies packed with frozen berries, kale, and ice. We strained the mixtures through a fine-mesh sieve to see how much pulp or berry seeds remained behind. We puréed hot soup, bean dip, turned peanuts into peanut butter, and attempted to make mayonnaise. As a final round, we made piña coladas to see how well the machines blended ice into slush.


Share All sharing options for: Review: These Are the Seven Best High-Performance Drink Blenders

Who makes the best blender for smoothies and mixed drinks? Nick Solares

People want a $200 blender that’s as good as a Vitamix or Blendtec. That doesn’t exist. But after researching dozens of blenders, talking with five experts and testing 16 models over the course of three years, we’ve found that you don’t have to plunk down half a grand for a great blender, but you should if you want the absolute silkiest frozen drinks. Most lower-end blenders, with their smaller motors, just aren’t up to the task, producing grainy textures or burning out with the strain of daily use. In the past, the only blenders that could really liquify kale stems, berry seeds, or ice were expensive high-performance models—Vitamix and Blendtec-level machines—which have much stronger motors.

However, some of the newer, relatively modestly-priced high-performance machines are surprisingly efficient at liquefying food. And we wanted to see how some of these newcomers would compare with the $400+ models.

To test, we made green smoothies packed with frozen berries, kale, and ice. We strained the mixtures through a fine-mesh sieve to see how much pulp or berry seeds remained behind. We puréed hot soup, bean dip, turned peanuts into peanut butter, and attempted to make mayonnaise. As a final round, we made piña coladas to see how well the machines blended ice into slush.


Watch the video: We Love Brits: Rihanna (August 2022).