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Raspberry oat slices recipe

Raspberry oat slices recipe


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This is so easy and is one of my favourite recipes. It tastes even better if you use homemade raspberry jam.

1674 people made this

IngredientsServes: 12

  • 5 tablespoons light brown soft sugar
  • 125g (4 1/2 oz) plain flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
  • pinch salt
  • 100g (4 oz) porridge oats
  • 125g (4 1/2 oz) butter, softened
  • 250g (9 oz) good quality raspberry jam

MethodPrep:15min ›Cook:40min ›Ready in:55min

  1. Preheat oven to 180 C / Gas mark 4. Grease one 20cm (8 inch) square cake tin, and line with baking parchment.
  2. Combine brown sugar, flour, bicarbonate of soda, salt and porridge oats in a large bowl. Rub in the butter using your hands to form a crumbly mixture.
  3. Press 3/4 of the mixture into the bottom of the prepared cake tin, reserving the rest for the topping. Spread the jam over the base but not quite to the edges as it will spread.
  4. Sprinkle the remaining crumb mixture over the top and lightly press it into the jam.
  5. Bake for 35 to 40 minutes in preheated oven or until lightly browned. Allow to cool before cutting into slices.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(1814)

Reviews in English (1444)

Lovely recipe, found that it needed a tbsp of golden syrup to bind it and used 75g stork, 75g brown sugar, 75g flour, 125g jam and 125g oats and it came out perfect and a bit lower on the old calories!-20 Mar 2012

This works wonderfully with applesauce and cinnamon - like an Apple crumble bar! I'll be making these a lot I think :D-02 Aug 2013

A big hit, thanks! I used olive spread instead of butter as I realized at the last minute that I hadn't any. Still worked Also, I found pressing it into the tin a challenge as it stuck to everything I used to press it in; ended up taking it out of the tin, rolling it into a ball and using a rolling pin to make the oblong shape of my tin. Worked a treat.-24 Oct 2011


My friend made these raspberry oat bars for a cake sale at my son’s school last month and, after tasting one, I immediately asked for the recipe. They’re super easy to make and the oaty crunchiness contrasts nicely with the gooey jam. If you use sugar free jam they’re not too sweet and make perfect lunch box treats.

Ingredients:

5 tablespoons light brown soft sugar

1/4 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda

125g (4 1/2 oz) butter, softened

250g (9 oz) good quality raspberry jam

Preparation method:

1. Preheat the oven to 180c/Gas mark 4. Grease one 20cm (8 inch) square cake tin and line with baking parchment.

2. Combine brown sugar, flour, bicarbonate of soda, salt and porridge oats in a large bowl. Rub in the butter using your hands to form a crumbly mixture.

3. Press 3/4 of the mixture into the bottom of the prepared cake tin, reserving the rest for the topping. Spread the jam over the base but not quite to the edges as it will spread.

4. Sprinkle the remaining crumb mixture over the top and lightly press it into the jam.

5. Bake for 35 to 40 minutes in the preheated oven until lightly browned. Allow to cool before cutting into slices.


More slice recipes you may enjoy

Zucchini Chocolate Brownies – Sneaking in the zucchini makes this brownie rich, moist and ooh so yummy. Your kids won’t even realise this brownie is a little healthy too!

Raw Fruit and Nut Slice – If I had the patience on this day I would of rolled/squeezed them into balls, but instead it was easier to press the mixture into a cake pan and then slice after it had set. This is not a treat for school lunch boxes as it’s filled with nuts, perhaps as an after school snack for the kids but definitely something you can have with your coffee!!

Healthy Chocolate Rice Bubble Bars – My kids always ask for the store variety LCM rice bubble bars, but making them at home is really easy and so much more cost effective. Making one batch of these healthy chocolate rice bubble bars only takes minutes and makes 16 good sized portions.


Raspberry Oat Bars

These vegan raspberry oat bars are a perfect afternoon treat. The buttery oaty base holds layer of a zingy raspberry jam and is topped with an oaty crumble topping.

Making the oat bars

These oat bars are vegan friendly and come together with ingredients that you might already have in your kitchen

  • flour
  • brown sugar
  • bicarbonate of soda
  • oats
  • dairy-free butter
  • golden syrup
  • raspberry jam

For the base

This is a super simple, one-bowl recipe, which is great for minimal washing up!

Start with mixing the dry ingredients. Mix the sugar, flour and bicarb in a large bowl. You can do this with a wooden spoon, no mixer needed!

Adding the wet ingredients

Add the oats and butter cubes to the dry mixture. Rub the mixture between your fingertips for a few minutes until the whole mixture is like small breadcrumbs. You should be able to press the mixture together into a dough.

The golden syrup

The secret ingredient in this oat base is golden syrup. It’s the ingredient that makes flapjack taste so good. It adds a rich, gooey flavour and sticky texture to the oats that makes these so chewy.

You can skip the golden syrup if you don’t have it, but I would highly recommend adding it in.

Assembling the bars

An 8 inch cake tin is a great size for these bars, because it’s not too wide so you get nice, thick bars. Start with lining your cake tin with greaseproof paper.

Press most of the oat mixture into a cake tin. Spread lots of raspberry jam on top. You can use any flavour jam here, I love raspberry conserve – it’s my favourite!

Try and avoid spreading the raspberry jam right to the edge, stick with leaving a border of 2-3cm around the edge. The jam will spread as it heats up in the oven, so it’ll stick to the edge of the cake tin and be a nightmare to remove when it’s cooled!

Crumble the rest of the oat mixture on top of the jam and press it lightly onto the jam.

Baking the Oat Bars

Bake for 35-40 mins. Check it about 30 mins in. It’ll only be very lightly golden on top.

When you think, mmm, maybe it could bake for another couple of minutes, that’s when it’s done! It’ll set a bit more as it cools down, and ever so slightly under baking it will keep the texture nice and chewy.


Recipe: Raspberry Oat Slices

My friend made these raspberry oat bars for a cake sale at my son’s school last month and, after tasting one, I immediately asked for the recipe. They’re super easy to make and the oaty crunchiness contrasts nicely with the gooey jam. If you use sugar free jam they’re not too sweet and make perfect lunch box treats.

Ingredients:

5 tablespoons light brown soft sugar

1/4 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda

125g (4 1/2 oz) butter, softened

250g (9 oz) good quality raspberry jam

Preparation method:

1. Preheat the oven to 180c/Gas mark 4. Grease one 20cm (8 inch) square cake tin and line with baking parchment.

2. Combine brown sugar, flour, bicarbonate of soda, salt and porridge oats in a large bowl. Rub in the butter using your hands to form a crumbly mixture.

3. Press 3/4 of the mixture into the bottom of the prepared cake tin, reserving the rest for the topping. Spread the jam over the base but not quite to the edges as it will spread.

4. Sprinkle the remaining crumb mixture over the top and lightly press it into the jam.

5. Bake for 35 to 40 minutes in the preheated oven until lightly browned. Allow to cool before cutting into slices.


Recipe: Raspberry Slices (Hindbærsnitter)

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Nutritional Information for the recipe Raspberry Crumble Squares

Per Serving Per 100 g / ml
Energy 532 kJ
127 kcal
1482 kJ
354 kcal
Fat 6.44 g 17.90 g
Carbohydrate 15.44 g 42.90 g
Protein 1.41 g 3.92 g

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    Raspberry flapjack slices

    Raspberry flapjack slices are packed full vitamin C from the raspberries and healthy fats from the nuts, seeds, butter and coconut oil. Try to use organic butter as it is higher in omega 3 oils and healthier than margarine, and remember, oats are a super food as they release their energy slowly and are high in the soluble fibre beta-glucan that can help lower cholesterol.

    Serves: 10 Cooking Time: 10 minutes

    Ingredients

    350g oats
    25g flax seeds
    25g pumpkin seeds
    25g chia seeds

    50g organic butter
    50g virgin coconut oil
    50g honey

    250g raspberries
    20g coconut flour/oat flour

    Method

    To begin making the raspberry flapjack slices, preheat an oven to 180C, 350F, gas mark 4. Line a 20cm x 4cm (8 x 1 ½ inch) square cake tin with a large piece of non-stick baking paper, snipping diagonally into the corners so that the paper fits snugly over the base and up the sides of the tin.


    Healthy Raspberry Oatmeal Cookies Can you get someone fired by giving them cookies? I’m not sure I want to know the answer to that because I certainly thought I did last fall! In October, after perfecting the recipe for my toffee coffee cookies, I packed up a few in a little bag to hand to the funny college-aged cashier with dreadlocks at Trader Joe’s. When I failed to see him on every one of my bi-weekly shopping trips after that day, I basically blamed myself for him losing his job. A few months later, on a rainy Saturday morning in February, I sprinted through the downpour into the store, picked up my usual bananas, spinach, and eggs, and hopped into the shortest line. As I waited for the girl to finish packing up the previous patron’s bags, I glanced towards the employee station—and there he was! Smiles, positivity, dreadlocks, and all. Whew—he just changed his shift! Fast forward to last week, a random Wednesday in July, and I happened to pick his line again. As I handed over my 8 bananas (I eat one every morning with breakfast, so they disappear faster than my dark chocolate stash!), he asked if I planned on baking banana bread. “I’m not sure yet,” I replied. “But I’m baking cookies this afternoon!” “I remember—and they were the BEST cookies ever!” He turned to the shopper ahead of me and explained, “She’s the nicest person ever! I just asked if she’d bring me cookies one time, and she showed up, like, 40 minutes later with the best cookies!” He continued, looking back at me, “I get off work at 6, so… If I gave you my address, would you mind dropping them off? I live just around the corner!” Laughingly, I agreed. But… I kind of forgot to mention that I needed to photograph them first. Sometimes people don’t quite understand the whole “food blog” thing. “Wait, so you bake… And take pictures… Of everything? As your job?” is the typical response I get. Sometimes it’s just easier to say that I bake for a living! But anyway, back to the story… These Healthy Raspberry Oatmeal Cookies were the ones that I baked! Incredibly soft and chewy, with just the slightest hint of spice, these treats taste like the epitome of summer from their fresh juicy berries and light floral notes. With their sweet flavors, nobody will be able to tell they’re low fat, clean eating, and less than 100 calories each. (Yes, they’re made with NO butter, refined flour or refined sugar!) For the cookie dough base, I started with the most popular recipe on my blog: my blueberry oatmeal cookies. Hundreds of readers have baked them, and they commented that not only were those the softest and chewiest cookies they’ve ever made, but their families and friends couldn’t tell they were healthy. That’s basically the biggest compliment a healthy baking blogger could ever ask for! To make sure your cookies turn out extremely soft and chewy, you must measure both the whole wheat flour and old-fashioned oats correctly . Lightly spoon each into the measuring cups, and level with a knife. Do NOT stick the measuring cup into the container and scoop them out. You’ll end up with 1.5 times as much, which will dry out your cookies and leave them crumbly. (For a more detailed explanation, check out my Baking Basics!) Chilling is mandatory. Initially, the dough will be very sticky, almost like thick muffin batter. Chilling allows the oats to absorb some of the liquids and thicken up the dough. If you forget to chill, you’ll end up with one big cookie blob, so learn from my mistake and pop the bowl in the fridge! When dividing up the cookie dough to place on the baking sheet, try to drop them into rounded scoops, about as tall as they are wide. The raspberries contain a fair amount of water, which they release while baking, so the cookies spread a lot. Shaping the dough into taller mounds helps minimize the spread (so that don’t form that dreaded cookie blob!). Because we’re using honey, which crystallizes at a lower temperature than granulated or brown sugar, we’ll bake these cookies lower and slower than your typical recipes: 325°F for 13-15 minutes . Do not over-bake them! When you remove the cookies from the oven, they should still look and feel underdone—that’s good! We’ll let them cool for at least 15 minutes on the warm baking sheet, which allows the centers to finishing cooking through without the outsides turning crisp and crunchy. They’ll stay soft for an entire week, if they last that long! (And yes, I did double-check. It was pure torture leaving the container on the counter for the full seven days!) Bright and fruity, these Healthy Raspberry Oatmeal Cookies require some serious willpower not to devour the entire batch! Those cute pink freckles, with the oaty flecks peeking through, are just too tempting—and their extra soft, chewy texture makes them even more addictive! The next day, after finishing their photo shoot, I dropped off a plate of these cookies at the cashier’s house with his roommate. Although he wasn’t home, hopefully I’ll hear about them on my next TJ’s visit! And when you make your own, remember to snap a picture and share it on Instagram using #amyshealthybaking and tagging @amyshealthybaking IN the photo itself! (That guarantees I’ll see your picture! ?) I’d love to see your cookies and feature them in my Sunday Spotlight series! HOW TO MAKE HEALTHY RASPBERRY CRUMBLE BARS

    Let’s go over how to make these healthy raspberry crumble bars!

    You’ll start with the simple sugar cookie crust. And even better than regular sugar cookies… No rolling pin required here! You’ll just spread the cookie dough into your pan with your hands or a spatula.

    But I’m getting ahead of myself…

    You have to make it first! .


    To do that, you’ll need white whole wheat flour and just a bit of baking powder and salt. Not too much baking powder! You don’t want your cookie dough crust to rise tall like a cake. You’ll add just enough baking powder to give it a lighter texture.

    If you’ve browsed through my recipes before, then you probably know what white whole wheat flour is already! But if you don’t… It’s not a combination of white (aka all-purpose) flour and regular whole wheat flour!

    Instead, white whole wheat flour is made by finely grinding a special type of soft white wheat (hence the name!), whereas regular whole wheat flour comes from a heartier variety of red wheat. They both have the same health benefits (like extra fiber!), but white whole wheat flour has a lighter taste and texture. This lets the sweet taste of your healthy raspberry crumble bars really shine!

    Just remember, it’s extremely important to measure the flour (and oats—when you get there!) correctly, using this method or a kitchen scale. ← That’s the one I own and love! Too much flour will make your sugar cookie crust dry and crumbly, rather than soft and chewy.


    Unlike traditional sugar cookie recipes that call for a full stick (or more!) of butter, you just need 1 ½ tablespoons of butter or coconut oil. That small amount really helps keep your healthy raspberry crumble bars low fat and low calorie!

    You’ll also skip the eggs found in traditional sugar cookie recipes! Instead, you’ll use unsweetened cashew milk. Any milk will work, but unsweetened cashew milk is one of my favorite dairy-free options! (Unsweetened almond milk is my other favorite.) Unsweetened cashew milk is thick and creamy, with a consistency similar to whole milk, and it works perfectly in nearly all of my baking recipes.

    Bonus: If you use coconut oil and cashew milk, then your healthy raspberry crumble bars will be egg free, dairy free, and vegan!


    To sweeten your cookie dough, you’ll actually use a combination of pure maple syrup and liquid stevia. I know it isn’t all that fun to track down extra ingredients… But I promise there’s a reason for this!

    If you just used pure maple syrup and added enough to make your healthy sugar cookie dough taste just as sweet as traditional recipes, that would add way too much liquid to the cookie dough… It would have the same consistency as muffin batter. So your cookie dough “crust” would turn out more like a cake! Not good.

    But if you just added enough maple syrup to give your sugar cookie dough the correct consistency, it wouldn’t taste nearly sweet enough… It would taste more like bread. Also not good.

    So that’s where the liquid stevia comes in! Stevia is a plant-based, zero-calorie sweetener that contains nothing refined or artificial (aka it’s clean eating friendly). It’s also really concentrated. By adding just 1 ½ teaspoons, you add the sweetness equivalent of nearly ¾ cup of maple syrup!


    By using the combination of pure maple syrup and liquid stevia, your sugar cookie crust is soft, chewy, and perfectly sweet. The best of both worlds!

    Tip: I buy my liquid stevia online here because that’s the best price I’ve found, and you’ll use it in all of these other recipes of mine, too!

    One last ingredient for your cookie dough! It’s one of my favorites… Almond extract! Almond extract makes your healthy raspberry crumble bars taste a little fancier. (It’s also shelf-stable and keeps for ages, so it’s definitely worth having in your pantry!)


    Let’s move on to the filling! That’s the easiest part… Just stir together chopped fresh raspberries and cornstarch. Seriously. That’s it!

    And yes, the cornstarch is necessary. Raspberries contain a lot of juice and moisture, which they release while baking. Once heated, the cornstarch thickens that juice and moisture, especially while your healthy raspberry crumble bars cool. That cornstarch is what enables the filling to stick together and not squirt out all over the place!


    Next comes the topping! This part is also really easy to make. You’ll whisk together oats, a bit more white whole wheat flour, and cinnamon in a small bowl. Make a well in the center. Then pour in pure maple syrup and teensy bit of melted butter.

    Yes, melted butter! I love using melted butter (or coconut oil!) in my streusel toppings instead of cold butter because it’s so much easier to mix together. I spent my entire childhood, from kindergarten through high school, working really hard to cut cold butter into my oat streusel toppings for fruit crumbles… And it took a lot of effort. But with melted butter, it takes all of 10 seconds to stir together.

    Such a great time and energy saving baking hack, right? .

    Tip: I buy my favorite cinnamon online here! It tastes stronger, richer, and a bit sweeter than regular cinnamon. It’s the only kind I use in my baking now!


    Time to assemble your crumble bars! I line my baking pan with parchment paper first, which makes it much easier to remove your healthy raspberry crumble bars. If you clamp it in place with binder clips (like these!), that makes the bars even easier to assemble!

    First, you’ll press your sugar cookie dough into a thin even layer in the bottom of the pan. I typically use my hands to do this, but you can use a spatula if it sticks to your hands. It does require a bit of gentle massaging, but I promise there’s enough cookie dough to completely cover the bottom of your pan!

    Next, spread your raspberry filling on top. Easy as pie! (Or… Easy as crumble bars?)


    Finally, sprinkle the oat streusel topping over the filling. The streusel clumps a lot, so break up those big clumps into tiny pieces before you sprinkle! I just rub it between my fingers to break it up. Just like with the cookie dough, I promise there’s enough streusel to cover the raspberry filling in a thin even layer. (But if you prefer more streusel, you can certainly double the topping!)

    Once your pan has finished baking, you must let your healthy raspberry crumble bars rest for at least 3 hours once they’ve reached room temperature . This is mandatory! Remember how we talked about the cornstarch earlier? It continues to work its thickening magic as the crumble bars cool and rest. If you cut into them earlier, the filling will squirt all over the place. But if you let them rest long enough (or put your pan in the fridge to speed up the process!), the filling will be nice and firm.


    Then all that’s left to decide is how many bars you’ll keep for yourself… And how many you’ll actually share! . And when you make your own, remember to snap a picture and share it on Instagram using #amyshealthybaking and tagging @amyshealthybaking IN the photo itself! (That guarantees I’ll see your picture! . ) I’d love to see your healthy raspberry crumble bars!

    • for the topping
    • ½ cup (50g) instant oats (gluten-free if necessary and measured like this)
    • 2 tbsp (15g) white whole wheat flour or millet flour (measured like this)
    • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
    • 4 tsp pure maple syrup, room temperature
    • 2 tsp coconut oil or unsalted butter, melted

    • for the filling
    • generous 2 ½ cups (360g) fresh raspberries, quartered (see Notes!)
    • 1 ½ tbsp (12g) cornstarch

    • for the crust
    • 1 ¼ cups (150g) white whole wheat flour or gluten-free* flour (measured like this)
    • ¼ tsp baking powder
    • ¼ tsp salt
    • 1 ½ tbsp coconut oil or unsalted butter, melted
    • 3 tbsp (45mL) unsweetened cashew milk, room temperature
    • 1 tsp almond extract
    • 1 ½ tsp liquid stevia
    • 2 tbsp (30mL) pure maple syrup
    1. Preheat the oven to 350°F, and line an 8”-square pan with parchment paper (or coat an 8”-square pan with nonstick cooking spray).
    2. To prepare the topping, stir together the oats, flour, and cinnamon. Make a well in the center. Pour in the maple syrup and coconut oil or butter, and stir until all ingredients are completely incorporated.
    3. To prepare the filling, gently toss together the raspberries and cornstarch.
    4. To prepare the crust, whisk together the flour, baking power, and salt in a small bowl. In a separate bowl, whisk together the coconut oil or butter, milk, almond extract, and liquid stevia. Stir in the maple syrup. Add in the flour mixture, stirring just until incorporated.
    5. Press the crust into the bottom of the prepared pan into a thin, even layer using your hands. (If it sticks to your fingers, then moisten your fingers with a tiny bit of water, and continue as needed.) Spread the filling evenly across the crust. Sprinkle the oat mixture on top of the raspberries. (It tends to clump, so break it into tiny pieces as you go!) Bake at 350°F for 28-34 minutes or until the topping feels firm and the crust appears to be done. Cool completely to room temperature in the pan, and let the bars rest for at least 3 hours once at room temperature before slicing and serving.

    Notes: Instant oats are also called “quick cooking” or “one minute” oats. They’re smaller and thinner than traditional old-fashioned rolled oats. In a pinch, old-fashioned oats may be substituted.

    Whole wheat pastry flour, regular whole wheat flour, or all-purpose flour may be substituted for the white whole wheat flour. Any gluten-free flour, except coconut flour, may be substituted for the millet flour.

    In the crust, most store-bought gluten-free flour blends (like this one!) will work, if measured like this.

    Remember to measure the oats and flour using this method or a kitchen scale! (← That’s the one I own.) Too much of either ingredient will dry out the streusel topping and sugar cookie crust.

    Agave or honey may be substituted for the maple syrup.

    Don’t skip cutting the raspberries! They should be no larger than the size of chocolate chips. This smaller size ensures your bars bake evenly and that you have an even layer of berries spread all the way across the crust.

    Both fresh raspberries and frozen and thawed raspberries will work. If using frozen and thawed, drain them really well and gently pat them dry with paper towels first.

    I highly recommend using the liquid stevia! I buy mine online here, and you’ll also use it in all of these recipes of mine. You cannot substitute additional pure maple syrup for the liquid stevia because the cookies require a precise balance of wet and dry ingredients. However, you may substitute ½ cup + 2 tablespoons (120g) coconut sugar (or brown sugar or granulated sugar, if you aren’t concerned about keeping these cookies clean eating friendly) for both the pure maple syrup and stevia in the cookie bars, but the crust won’t be as sweet and will appear “speckled” if using coconut sugar because it doesn’t dissolve as well.

    Any milk may be substituted for the unsweetened cashew milk.

    If you aren’t a fan of almond extract, then substitute vanilla extract instead.

    If you prefer a thicker layer of streusel, then double the topping.

    If lining the pan with parchment paper, I highly recommend clamping it to the pan’s edges with binder clips (like these!) to prevent it from moving around when you press the crust across the bottom.

    For more tips and information, please see my blog post above!


    What is White Whole Wheat Flour?

    White whole-wheat flour is milled from hard white spring wheat rather than traditional red wheat and still provides whole grains. Compared to red wheat, white wheat lacks some of the pigmentation in the bran layer of the wheat berry since that pigment carries an astringent flavor, white wheat is lighter in both color and flavor. The result is baked goods will be lighter in color than using whole wheat, they will also have a milder taste and be less course in texture. You can use it for cookies, bars, bread, muffins, pancakes as a substitute for all-purpose white flour and whole wheat flour. (Source: King Arthur’s Flour)

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