America's Best Donuts



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When it comes to American comfort food, nothing seems to satisfy a sweet craving quite like a freshly made donut. Sure, cupcakes have not-so-subtly swept the nation and churros had a brief spike in popularity a few years ago, but donuts remain a unique savory-sweet confection that tugs at our heartstrings like none other. And with National Donut Day coming up this weekend, here is a collection of the best places to grab a dozen or so.

Click here for America's Best Donuts

Our list includes some truly classic establishments that have become American institutions, like Randy's Donuts in Los Angeles and Café Du Monde in New Orleans, but it also encompasses some new-wave doughnut shops, such as Federal Donuts in Philadelphia and VooDoo Donut in Portland, Ore. A recurring theme across this list was the presence of vegan bakeries, such as Mighty-O Donuts in Seattle, Pepples Donuts in San Francisco, and Ronald's Doughnuts in Las Vegas.

Regardless of whether you're in the mood for a glazed cruller, an old-fashioned cider doughnut, or one topped with frosting and Fruit Loops, these shops are sure to have exactly what you're looking for. Here are five significant, non-Dunkin'/Tim Horton's spots for doughnuts in or near each of The Daily Meal's featured cities — plus a collection of other notable doughnut shops deserving of mention.

Is your favorite doughnut shop missing? Leave a comment below or share your thoughts by writing a review for us.

Plus, if your sweet craving isn't satisfied just yet, check out these donut-related stories from The Daily Meal:

London's Best Doughnut Shops

In honor of the 21st annual National Doughnut Week (May 12 to 19), a fundraiser for The Children’s Trust in the U.K., The Daily Meal has found London’s best doughnut shops.

Dun-Well opened just a few months ago in East Williamsburg, the creation of Christopher Hollowell and Daniel Dunbar, who claim on their site that "it's the premiere vegan doughnut shop on planet Earth."

Sure, we’ve all heard about Dunkin’ Donuts' crazy dried pork doughnut in China, but it seems like there’s a slew of strangely flavored doughnuts abroad, running the gamut from sweet to savory.

Originally published 12/20/11


This 100-year-old doughnut recipe dates back to World War I

Did you know there are actually two National Doughnut Days? Or that Emily Post issued rules on dunking? We've sorted through the Internet to find six of the tastiest facts you might not know about doughnuts.

Who knew eating a doughnut on Doughnut Day was extremely patriotic? Well, you do now.

But before you run out to your nearest Krispy Kreme to grab a dozen -- or two -- glazed originals, you might want to instead turn to somewhere a little closer to home for your doughnut fix. Specifically, your home. Even more specifically, your kitchen, where you can whip up this 100-year-old recipe that originated during World War I.

Though doughnut shops did not become a staple of America until mid-century, the love of the fried dough confection was still there. (National WWI Museum and Memorial)

And more than just eating your history, you can learn more about the creation of National Doughnut Day, which was established in 1938 to honor the “Doughnut Lassies,” Salvation Army volunteers who risked their lives and served the American Expeditionary Forces in France by providing, among other support, hot and fresh doughnuts. Two “Lassies” or “Salvationists” pioneered the doughnut movement, though various humanitarian groups adopted the trend.

“What doughnut day is about is about this sense of volunteerism,” Lora Vogt, curator of education at the National WWI Museum and Memorial in Kansas City, Mo., told Fox News in an interview.

"It was to create that space of healing and bring a little bit of home with food – that was a really important part of being able to heal."

— Lora Vogt, Curator of Education at the National WWI Museum and Memorial in Kansas City, Mo.

“Originally, the Salvationists thought to do cakes or pies,” Vogt said, saying their position was to provide comfort and help the emotional and mental health of troops.

“Part of what they wanted to do was provide food, but resources available made this really difficult.”

Until two women thought of doughnuts in 1918 -- a relatively low-maintenance treat that could be made quickly using whatever was available to them.

“This is how many Americans became introduced to the doughnut,” Vogt said. “This was the beginning of America’s love of the doughnut.” Though she did say some historians say a variation of the doughnut was introduced around the Civil War.

Vogt said that when U.S. service members returned, the demand for doughnuts was so high, one New York doughnut shop could not keep up.

Two women thought of making the doughnuts for the troops – a relatively low-maintenance treat that could be made quickly using whatever was available to them. (National WWI Museum and Memorial)

Though doughnut shops did not become a staple of America until mid-century, the love of the fried dough confection was still there.

“The original doughnut wasn’t at sweet as we have it today, and it wasn’t glazed as it was made to conserve time and energy,” she said, but it was just as comforting as it is today.

“It was to create that space of healing and bring a little bit of home with food -- that was a really important part of being able to heal.”


This 100-year-old doughnut recipe dates back to World War I

Did you know there are actually two National Doughnut Days? Or that Emily Post issued rules on dunking? We've sorted through the Internet to find six of the tastiest facts you might not know about doughnuts.

Who knew eating a doughnut on Doughnut Day was extremely patriotic? Well, you do now.

But before you run out to your nearest Krispy Kreme to grab a dozen -- or two -- glazed originals, you might want to instead turn to somewhere a little closer to home for your doughnut fix. Specifically, your home. Even more specifically, your kitchen, where you can whip up this 100-year-old recipe that originated during World War I.

Though doughnut shops did not become a staple of America until mid-century, the love of the fried dough confection was still there. (National WWI Museum and Memorial)

And more than just eating your history, you can learn more about the creation of National Doughnut Day, which was established in 1938 to honor the “Doughnut Lassies,” Salvation Army volunteers who risked their lives and served the American Expeditionary Forces in France by providing, among other support, hot and fresh doughnuts. Two “Lassies” or “Salvationists” pioneered the doughnut movement, though various humanitarian groups adopted the trend.

“What doughnut day is about is about this sense of volunteerism,” Lora Vogt, curator of education at the National WWI Museum and Memorial in Kansas City, Mo., told Fox News in an interview.

"It was to create that space of healing and bring a little bit of home with food – that was a really important part of being able to heal."

— Lora Vogt, Curator of Education at the National WWI Museum and Memorial in Kansas City, Mo.

“Originally, the Salvationists thought to do cakes or pies,” Vogt said, saying their position was to provide comfort and help the emotional and mental health of troops.

“Part of what they wanted to do was provide food, but resources available made this really difficult.”

Until two women thought of doughnuts in 1918 -- a relatively low-maintenance treat that could be made quickly using whatever was available to them.

“This is how many Americans became introduced to the doughnut,” Vogt said. “This was the beginning of America’s love of the doughnut.” Though she did say some historians say a variation of the doughnut was introduced around the Civil War.

Vogt said that when U.S. service members returned, the demand for doughnuts was so high, one New York doughnut shop could not keep up.

Two women thought of making the doughnuts for the troops – a relatively low-maintenance treat that could be made quickly using whatever was available to them. (National WWI Museum and Memorial)

Though doughnut shops did not become a staple of America until mid-century, the love of the fried dough confection was still there.

“The original doughnut wasn’t at sweet as we have it today, and it wasn’t glazed as it was made to conserve time and energy,” she said, but it was just as comforting as it is today.

“It was to create that space of healing and bring a little bit of home with food -- that was a really important part of being able to heal.”


This 100-year-old doughnut recipe dates back to World War I

Did you know there are actually two National Doughnut Days? Or that Emily Post issued rules on dunking? We've sorted through the Internet to find six of the tastiest facts you might not know about doughnuts.

Who knew eating a doughnut on Doughnut Day was extremely patriotic? Well, you do now.

But before you run out to your nearest Krispy Kreme to grab a dozen -- or two -- glazed originals, you might want to instead turn to somewhere a little closer to home for your doughnut fix. Specifically, your home. Even more specifically, your kitchen, where you can whip up this 100-year-old recipe that originated during World War I.

Though doughnut shops did not become a staple of America until mid-century, the love of the fried dough confection was still there. (National WWI Museum and Memorial)

And more than just eating your history, you can learn more about the creation of National Doughnut Day, which was established in 1938 to honor the “Doughnut Lassies,” Salvation Army volunteers who risked their lives and served the American Expeditionary Forces in France by providing, among other support, hot and fresh doughnuts. Two “Lassies” or “Salvationists” pioneered the doughnut movement, though various humanitarian groups adopted the trend.

“What doughnut day is about is about this sense of volunteerism,” Lora Vogt, curator of education at the National WWI Museum and Memorial in Kansas City, Mo., told Fox News in an interview.

"It was to create that space of healing and bring a little bit of home with food – that was a really important part of being able to heal."

— Lora Vogt, Curator of Education at the National WWI Museum and Memorial in Kansas City, Mo.

“Originally, the Salvationists thought to do cakes or pies,” Vogt said, saying their position was to provide comfort and help the emotional and mental health of troops.

“Part of what they wanted to do was provide food, but resources available made this really difficult.”

Until two women thought of doughnuts in 1918 -- a relatively low-maintenance treat that could be made quickly using whatever was available to them.

“This is how many Americans became introduced to the doughnut,” Vogt said. “This was the beginning of America’s love of the doughnut.” Though she did say some historians say a variation of the doughnut was introduced around the Civil War.

Vogt said that when U.S. service members returned, the demand for doughnuts was so high, one New York doughnut shop could not keep up.

Two women thought of making the doughnuts for the troops – a relatively low-maintenance treat that could be made quickly using whatever was available to them. (National WWI Museum and Memorial)

Though doughnut shops did not become a staple of America until mid-century, the love of the fried dough confection was still there.

“The original doughnut wasn’t at sweet as we have it today, and it wasn’t glazed as it was made to conserve time and energy,” she said, but it was just as comforting as it is today.

“It was to create that space of healing and bring a little bit of home with food -- that was a really important part of being able to heal.”


This 100-year-old doughnut recipe dates back to World War I

Did you know there are actually two National Doughnut Days? Or that Emily Post issued rules on dunking? We've sorted through the Internet to find six of the tastiest facts you might not know about doughnuts.

Who knew eating a doughnut on Doughnut Day was extremely patriotic? Well, you do now.

But before you run out to your nearest Krispy Kreme to grab a dozen -- or two -- glazed originals, you might want to instead turn to somewhere a little closer to home for your doughnut fix. Specifically, your home. Even more specifically, your kitchen, where you can whip up this 100-year-old recipe that originated during World War I.

Though doughnut shops did not become a staple of America until mid-century, the love of the fried dough confection was still there. (National WWI Museum and Memorial)

And more than just eating your history, you can learn more about the creation of National Doughnut Day, which was established in 1938 to honor the “Doughnut Lassies,” Salvation Army volunteers who risked their lives and served the American Expeditionary Forces in France by providing, among other support, hot and fresh doughnuts. Two “Lassies” or “Salvationists” pioneered the doughnut movement, though various humanitarian groups adopted the trend.

“What doughnut day is about is about this sense of volunteerism,” Lora Vogt, curator of education at the National WWI Museum and Memorial in Kansas City, Mo., told Fox News in an interview.

"It was to create that space of healing and bring a little bit of home with food – that was a really important part of being able to heal."

— Lora Vogt, Curator of Education at the National WWI Museum and Memorial in Kansas City, Mo.

“Originally, the Salvationists thought to do cakes or pies,” Vogt said, saying their position was to provide comfort and help the emotional and mental health of troops.

“Part of what they wanted to do was provide food, but resources available made this really difficult.”

Until two women thought of doughnuts in 1918 -- a relatively low-maintenance treat that could be made quickly using whatever was available to them.

“This is how many Americans became introduced to the doughnut,” Vogt said. “This was the beginning of America’s love of the doughnut.” Though she did say some historians say a variation of the doughnut was introduced around the Civil War.

Vogt said that when U.S. service members returned, the demand for doughnuts was so high, one New York doughnut shop could not keep up.

Two women thought of making the doughnuts for the troops – a relatively low-maintenance treat that could be made quickly using whatever was available to them. (National WWI Museum and Memorial)

Though doughnut shops did not become a staple of America until mid-century, the love of the fried dough confection was still there.

“The original doughnut wasn’t at sweet as we have it today, and it wasn’t glazed as it was made to conserve time and energy,” she said, but it was just as comforting as it is today.

“It was to create that space of healing and bring a little bit of home with food -- that was a really important part of being able to heal.”


This 100-year-old doughnut recipe dates back to World War I

Did you know there are actually two National Doughnut Days? Or that Emily Post issued rules on dunking? We've sorted through the Internet to find six of the tastiest facts you might not know about doughnuts.

Who knew eating a doughnut on Doughnut Day was extremely patriotic? Well, you do now.

But before you run out to your nearest Krispy Kreme to grab a dozen -- or two -- glazed originals, you might want to instead turn to somewhere a little closer to home for your doughnut fix. Specifically, your home. Even more specifically, your kitchen, where you can whip up this 100-year-old recipe that originated during World War I.

Though doughnut shops did not become a staple of America until mid-century, the love of the fried dough confection was still there. (National WWI Museum and Memorial)

And more than just eating your history, you can learn more about the creation of National Doughnut Day, which was established in 1938 to honor the “Doughnut Lassies,” Salvation Army volunteers who risked their lives and served the American Expeditionary Forces in France by providing, among other support, hot and fresh doughnuts. Two “Lassies” or “Salvationists” pioneered the doughnut movement, though various humanitarian groups adopted the trend.

“What doughnut day is about is about this sense of volunteerism,” Lora Vogt, curator of education at the National WWI Museum and Memorial in Kansas City, Mo., told Fox News in an interview.

"It was to create that space of healing and bring a little bit of home with food – that was a really important part of being able to heal."

— Lora Vogt, Curator of Education at the National WWI Museum and Memorial in Kansas City, Mo.

“Originally, the Salvationists thought to do cakes or pies,” Vogt said, saying their position was to provide comfort and help the emotional and mental health of troops.

“Part of what they wanted to do was provide food, but resources available made this really difficult.”

Until two women thought of doughnuts in 1918 -- a relatively low-maintenance treat that could be made quickly using whatever was available to them.

“This is how many Americans became introduced to the doughnut,” Vogt said. “This was the beginning of America’s love of the doughnut.” Though she did say some historians say a variation of the doughnut was introduced around the Civil War.

Vogt said that when U.S. service members returned, the demand for doughnuts was so high, one New York doughnut shop could not keep up.

Two women thought of making the doughnuts for the troops – a relatively low-maintenance treat that could be made quickly using whatever was available to them. (National WWI Museum and Memorial)

Though doughnut shops did not become a staple of America until mid-century, the love of the fried dough confection was still there.

“The original doughnut wasn’t at sweet as we have it today, and it wasn’t glazed as it was made to conserve time and energy,” she said, but it was just as comforting as it is today.

“It was to create that space of healing and bring a little bit of home with food -- that was a really important part of being able to heal.”


This 100-year-old doughnut recipe dates back to World War I

Did you know there are actually two National Doughnut Days? Or that Emily Post issued rules on dunking? We've sorted through the Internet to find six of the tastiest facts you might not know about doughnuts.

Who knew eating a doughnut on Doughnut Day was extremely patriotic? Well, you do now.

But before you run out to your nearest Krispy Kreme to grab a dozen -- or two -- glazed originals, you might want to instead turn to somewhere a little closer to home for your doughnut fix. Specifically, your home. Even more specifically, your kitchen, where you can whip up this 100-year-old recipe that originated during World War I.

Though doughnut shops did not become a staple of America until mid-century, the love of the fried dough confection was still there. (National WWI Museum and Memorial)

And more than just eating your history, you can learn more about the creation of National Doughnut Day, which was established in 1938 to honor the “Doughnut Lassies,” Salvation Army volunteers who risked their lives and served the American Expeditionary Forces in France by providing, among other support, hot and fresh doughnuts. Two “Lassies” or “Salvationists” pioneered the doughnut movement, though various humanitarian groups adopted the trend.

“What doughnut day is about is about this sense of volunteerism,” Lora Vogt, curator of education at the National WWI Museum and Memorial in Kansas City, Mo., told Fox News in an interview.

"It was to create that space of healing and bring a little bit of home with food – that was a really important part of being able to heal."

— Lora Vogt, Curator of Education at the National WWI Museum and Memorial in Kansas City, Mo.

“Originally, the Salvationists thought to do cakes or pies,” Vogt said, saying their position was to provide comfort and help the emotional and mental health of troops.

“Part of what they wanted to do was provide food, but resources available made this really difficult.”

Until two women thought of doughnuts in 1918 -- a relatively low-maintenance treat that could be made quickly using whatever was available to them.

“This is how many Americans became introduced to the doughnut,” Vogt said. “This was the beginning of America’s love of the doughnut.” Though she did say some historians say a variation of the doughnut was introduced around the Civil War.

Vogt said that when U.S. service members returned, the demand for doughnuts was so high, one New York doughnut shop could not keep up.

Two women thought of making the doughnuts for the troops – a relatively low-maintenance treat that could be made quickly using whatever was available to them. (National WWI Museum and Memorial)

Though doughnut shops did not become a staple of America until mid-century, the love of the fried dough confection was still there.

“The original doughnut wasn’t at sweet as we have it today, and it wasn’t glazed as it was made to conserve time and energy,” she said, but it was just as comforting as it is today.

“It was to create that space of healing and bring a little bit of home with food -- that was a really important part of being able to heal.”


This 100-year-old doughnut recipe dates back to World War I

Did you know there are actually two National Doughnut Days? Or that Emily Post issued rules on dunking? We've sorted through the Internet to find six of the tastiest facts you might not know about doughnuts.

Who knew eating a doughnut on Doughnut Day was extremely patriotic? Well, you do now.

But before you run out to your nearest Krispy Kreme to grab a dozen -- or two -- glazed originals, you might want to instead turn to somewhere a little closer to home for your doughnut fix. Specifically, your home. Even more specifically, your kitchen, where you can whip up this 100-year-old recipe that originated during World War I.

Though doughnut shops did not become a staple of America until mid-century, the love of the fried dough confection was still there. (National WWI Museum and Memorial)

And more than just eating your history, you can learn more about the creation of National Doughnut Day, which was established in 1938 to honor the “Doughnut Lassies,” Salvation Army volunteers who risked their lives and served the American Expeditionary Forces in France by providing, among other support, hot and fresh doughnuts. Two “Lassies” or “Salvationists” pioneered the doughnut movement, though various humanitarian groups adopted the trend.

“What doughnut day is about is about this sense of volunteerism,” Lora Vogt, curator of education at the National WWI Museum and Memorial in Kansas City, Mo., told Fox News in an interview.

"It was to create that space of healing and bring a little bit of home with food – that was a really important part of being able to heal."

— Lora Vogt, Curator of Education at the National WWI Museum and Memorial in Kansas City, Mo.

“Originally, the Salvationists thought to do cakes or pies,” Vogt said, saying their position was to provide comfort and help the emotional and mental health of troops.

“Part of what they wanted to do was provide food, but resources available made this really difficult.”

Until two women thought of doughnuts in 1918 -- a relatively low-maintenance treat that could be made quickly using whatever was available to them.

“This is how many Americans became introduced to the doughnut,” Vogt said. “This was the beginning of America’s love of the doughnut.” Though she did say some historians say a variation of the doughnut was introduced around the Civil War.

Vogt said that when U.S. service members returned, the demand for doughnuts was so high, one New York doughnut shop could not keep up.

Two women thought of making the doughnuts for the troops – a relatively low-maintenance treat that could be made quickly using whatever was available to them. (National WWI Museum and Memorial)

Though doughnut shops did not become a staple of America until mid-century, the love of the fried dough confection was still there.

“The original doughnut wasn’t at sweet as we have it today, and it wasn’t glazed as it was made to conserve time and energy,” she said, but it was just as comforting as it is today.

“It was to create that space of healing and bring a little bit of home with food -- that was a really important part of being able to heal.”


This 100-year-old doughnut recipe dates back to World War I

Did you know there are actually two National Doughnut Days? Or that Emily Post issued rules on dunking? We've sorted through the Internet to find six of the tastiest facts you might not know about doughnuts.

Who knew eating a doughnut on Doughnut Day was extremely patriotic? Well, you do now.

But before you run out to your nearest Krispy Kreme to grab a dozen -- or two -- glazed originals, you might want to instead turn to somewhere a little closer to home for your doughnut fix. Specifically, your home. Even more specifically, your kitchen, where you can whip up this 100-year-old recipe that originated during World War I.

Though doughnut shops did not become a staple of America until mid-century, the love of the fried dough confection was still there. (National WWI Museum and Memorial)

And more than just eating your history, you can learn more about the creation of National Doughnut Day, which was established in 1938 to honor the “Doughnut Lassies,” Salvation Army volunteers who risked their lives and served the American Expeditionary Forces in France by providing, among other support, hot and fresh doughnuts. Two “Lassies” or “Salvationists” pioneered the doughnut movement, though various humanitarian groups adopted the trend.

“What doughnut day is about is about this sense of volunteerism,” Lora Vogt, curator of education at the National WWI Museum and Memorial in Kansas City, Mo., told Fox News in an interview.

"It was to create that space of healing and bring a little bit of home with food – that was a really important part of being able to heal."

— Lora Vogt, Curator of Education at the National WWI Museum and Memorial in Kansas City, Mo.

“Originally, the Salvationists thought to do cakes or pies,” Vogt said, saying their position was to provide comfort and help the emotional and mental health of troops.

“Part of what they wanted to do was provide food, but resources available made this really difficult.”

Until two women thought of doughnuts in 1918 -- a relatively low-maintenance treat that could be made quickly using whatever was available to them.

“This is how many Americans became introduced to the doughnut,” Vogt said. “This was the beginning of America’s love of the doughnut.” Though she did say some historians say a variation of the doughnut was introduced around the Civil War.

Vogt said that when U.S. service members returned, the demand for doughnuts was so high, one New York doughnut shop could not keep up.

Two women thought of making the doughnuts for the troops – a relatively low-maintenance treat that could be made quickly using whatever was available to them. (National WWI Museum and Memorial)

Though doughnut shops did not become a staple of America until mid-century, the love of the fried dough confection was still there.

“The original doughnut wasn’t at sweet as we have it today, and it wasn’t glazed as it was made to conserve time and energy,” she said, but it was just as comforting as it is today.

“It was to create that space of healing and bring a little bit of home with food -- that was a really important part of being able to heal.”


This 100-year-old doughnut recipe dates back to World War I

Did you know there are actually two National Doughnut Days? Or that Emily Post issued rules on dunking? We've sorted through the Internet to find six of the tastiest facts you might not know about doughnuts.

Who knew eating a doughnut on Doughnut Day was extremely patriotic? Well, you do now.

But before you run out to your nearest Krispy Kreme to grab a dozen -- or two -- glazed originals, you might want to instead turn to somewhere a little closer to home for your doughnut fix. Specifically, your home. Even more specifically, your kitchen, where you can whip up this 100-year-old recipe that originated during World War I.

Though doughnut shops did not become a staple of America until mid-century, the love of the fried dough confection was still there. (National WWI Museum and Memorial)

And more than just eating your history, you can learn more about the creation of National Doughnut Day, which was established in 1938 to honor the “Doughnut Lassies,” Salvation Army volunteers who risked their lives and served the American Expeditionary Forces in France by providing, among other support, hot and fresh doughnuts. Two “Lassies” or “Salvationists” pioneered the doughnut movement, though various humanitarian groups adopted the trend.

“What doughnut day is about is about this sense of volunteerism,” Lora Vogt, curator of education at the National WWI Museum and Memorial in Kansas City, Mo., told Fox News in an interview.

"It was to create that space of healing and bring a little bit of home with food – that was a really important part of being able to heal."

— Lora Vogt, Curator of Education at the National WWI Museum and Memorial in Kansas City, Mo.

“Originally, the Salvationists thought to do cakes or pies,” Vogt said, saying their position was to provide comfort and help the emotional and mental health of troops.

“Part of what they wanted to do was provide food, but resources available made this really difficult.”

Until two women thought of doughnuts in 1918 -- a relatively low-maintenance treat that could be made quickly using whatever was available to them.

“This is how many Americans became introduced to the doughnut,” Vogt said. “This was the beginning of America’s love of the doughnut.” Though she did say some historians say a variation of the doughnut was introduced around the Civil War.

Vogt said that when U.S. service members returned, the demand for doughnuts was so high, one New York doughnut shop could not keep up.

Two women thought of making the doughnuts for the troops – a relatively low-maintenance treat that could be made quickly using whatever was available to them. (National WWI Museum and Memorial)

Though doughnut shops did not become a staple of America until mid-century, the love of the fried dough confection was still there.

“The original doughnut wasn’t at sweet as we have it today, and it wasn’t glazed as it was made to conserve time and energy,” she said, but it was just as comforting as it is today.

“It was to create that space of healing and bring a little bit of home with food -- that was a really important part of being able to heal.”


This 100-year-old doughnut recipe dates back to World War I

Did you know there are actually two National Doughnut Days? Or that Emily Post issued rules on dunking? We've sorted through the Internet to find six of the tastiest facts you might not know about doughnuts.

Who knew eating a doughnut on Doughnut Day was extremely patriotic? Well, you do now.

But before you run out to your nearest Krispy Kreme to grab a dozen -- or two -- glazed originals, you might want to instead turn to somewhere a little closer to home for your doughnut fix. Specifically, your home. Even more specifically, your kitchen, where you can whip up this 100-year-old recipe that originated during World War I.

Though doughnut shops did not become a staple of America until mid-century, the love of the fried dough confection was still there. (National WWI Museum and Memorial)

And more than just eating your history, you can learn more about the creation of National Doughnut Day, which was established in 1938 to honor the “Doughnut Lassies,” Salvation Army volunteers who risked their lives and served the American Expeditionary Forces in France by providing, among other support, hot and fresh doughnuts. Two “Lassies” or “Salvationists” pioneered the doughnut movement, though various humanitarian groups adopted the trend.

“What doughnut day is about is about this sense of volunteerism,” Lora Vogt, curator of education at the National WWI Museum and Memorial in Kansas City, Mo., told Fox News in an interview.

"It was to create that space of healing and bring a little bit of home with food – that was a really important part of being able to heal."

— Lora Vogt, Curator of Education at the National WWI Museum and Memorial in Kansas City, Mo.

“Originally, the Salvationists thought to do cakes or pies,” Vogt said, saying their position was to provide comfort and help the emotional and mental health of troops.

“Part of what they wanted to do was provide food, but resources available made this really difficult.”

Until two women thought of doughnuts in 1918 -- a relatively low-maintenance treat that could be made quickly using whatever was available to them.

“This is how many Americans became introduced to the doughnut,” Vogt said. “This was the beginning of America’s love of the doughnut.” Though she did say some historians say a variation of the doughnut was introduced around the Civil War.

Vogt said that when U.S. service members returned, the demand for doughnuts was so high, one New York doughnut shop could not keep up.

Two women thought of making the doughnuts for the troops – a relatively low-maintenance treat that could be made quickly using whatever was available to them. (National WWI Museum and Memorial)

Though doughnut shops did not become a staple of America until mid-century, the love of the fried dough confection was still there.

“The original doughnut wasn’t at sweet as we have it today, and it wasn’t glazed as it was made to conserve time and energy,” she said, but it was just as comforting as it is today.

“It was to create that space of healing and bring a little bit of home with food -- that was a really important part of being able to heal.”


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